eNeonatal Review eNeonatal Review sp eNeonatal Review image
eNeonatal Review spacer
HOME NEWSLETTER ARCHIVE CME/CE INFORMATION PROGRAM DIRECTORS EDIT
PROFILE
RECOMMEND TO A COLLEAGUE
Spacer
blue block sp
green block sp

Accreditation Statement

Physicians
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and Policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint sponsorship of The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and The Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing. The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Nurses
The Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Centerís Commission on Accreditation.

The Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing and the American Nurses Credentialing Center do not endorse the use of any commercial products discussed or displayed in conjunction with this educational activity.


Credit Designations

Physicians
eNewsletter: The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Podcast: The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine designates this educational activity for a maximum of 0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Nurses
eNewsletter: This 1.0 contact hour Educational Activity is provided by the Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing. Each newsletter carries a maximum of 1 contact hour or total of 8 contact hours for the 8 newsletters in this program.

Podcast: This 0.5 contact hour Educational Activity is provided by the Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing. Each podcast carries a maximum of 0.5 contact hours or a total of 4 contact hours for the 8 podcasts in this program.

Internet CME Policy

The Office of Continuing Medical Education (CME) at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine is committed to protecting the privacy of its members and customers. The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine maintains its Internet site as an information resource and service for physicians, other health professionals, and the public.

Continuing Medical Education at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine will keep your personal and credit information confidential when you participate in an Internet-based CME program. Your information will never be given to anyone outside of The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine program. CME collects only the information necessary to provide you with the services that you request.

Statement of Responsibility

The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine takes responsibility for the content, quality, and scientific integrity of this CME activity.


Intended Audience

This activity has been developed for neonatologists, respiratory therapists, neonatal nurses and nurse practitioners, and others involved in the care of patients in the NICU.

There are no fees or prerequisites for this activity.

Learning Objectives

After completing this activity, the participant will demonstrate the ability to:
  • Develop and implement appropriate NICU and post discharge care to prevent long-term airway obstruction and mild exercise intolerance in former premature infants with BPD later in life
  • Explain the clinical importance of calorie- and protein-enriched formulas to address nutritional deficiencies and prevent short-term development deficits and long-term damaging health effects
  • Review indication for incorporating guidelines for appropriate use of various noninvasive methods of pulmonary support (eg, modern nCPAP, niPPV, HHFNC)
  • Describe the comparative merits of IV soybean oil-based lipid emulsions and parental omega-3 lipid emulsions in the PNALD setting
  • Describe the progress and recent advances in diagnosis and management of nosocomial respiratory infections

Launch Date

June 21, 2012; activities expire 2 years from the date of publication

Faculty Disclosure

As a provider accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Office of Continuing Medical (OCME) requires signed disclosure of the existence of any financial relationships with industry from any individual in a position to control content of a CME activity sponsored by OCME. Members of the Planning Committee are required to disclose all relationships, regardless of their relevance to the activity content. Faculty are required to disclose only those relationships that are relevant to their specific presentations.

Statement of Need

An in-depth review of current medical literature, expert opinion, and survey in neonatology on the topics of infections, respiratory and nutrition revealed six professional practice gaps.

  • On the topic of neonatal infections, the two gaps identified are: Ventilator-acquired pneumonia (VAP) is one of the leading causes of preventable morbidity and mortality in NICUs and neonatologists need a consistent and precise approach to diagnosing and treating to minimize ineffective empiric antibiotic treatment. Second, central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) in NICUs is in most cases preventable; variable rates of sepsis in different NICUs indicate that adherence to best practices and vigilant preventive interventions are not as uniform as they could or should be.
  • On the topic of neonatal respiratory, the two gaps identified are: First, very low birth-weight (VLBW) babies with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BDP) spend long periods on mechanical ventilation, which poses its own dangers and has become almost routine. In addition to cognitive, educational, and behavioral impairments later in life, former premature infants with (BDP) also suffer higher rates of long-term airway obstruction and mild exercise intolerance, potentially preventable with better NICU and post-discharge care. Second, protocols for noninvasive methods of pulmonary support are underused or misused in many neonatal care settings, resulting in higher rates of lung injury in preterm infants from mechanical ventilation.
  • On the topic of neonatal nutrition, the two gaps identified are: First, the impact of early malnutrition can have negative effects on long-term outcomes, thus the concern that too few of the premature infants discharged with nutritional deficiencies receive calorie- and protein-enriched formulas that prevent near-term developmental deficits and long-term damaging health effects such as metabolic syndrome. Second, long term use of parenteral nutrition (PN) is associated with complications such as blood-stream infections and metabolic abnormalities; the most serious potential complication is PN-associated liver disease(PNALD). Neonatologists are not fully aware of the comparative merits of IV soybean oil-based lipid emulsions and parenteral omega-3 lipid emulsions in the parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) setting.
Disclaimer Statement

The opinions and recommendations expressed by faculty and other experts whose input is included in this program are their own. This enduring material is produced for educational purposes only. Use of The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine name implies review of educational format design and approach. Please review the complete prescribing information for specific drugs or combinations of drugs, including indications, contraindications, warnings, and adverse effects, before administering pharmacologic therapy to patients.

Successful Completion

To successfully complete this activity, participants must read the content, then link to The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicineís or The Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursingís website to complete the posttest and evaluation. Once you receive a passing grade, you can access and print your certificate of credit.

NOTE: If you have already registered for other Hopkins CME/CE programs on their prospective websites simply enter the requested information when prompted.

This activity is supported by educational grants from Abbott Nutrition, Cornerstone Pharmaceuticals, Ikaria, and Mead Johnson Nutrition.


Confidentiality Disclaimer for Conference Attendees

I certify that I am attending a Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine CME activity for accredited training and/or educational purposes.

I understand that while I am attending in this capacity, I may be exposed to "protected health information," as that term is defined and used in Hopkins policies and in the federal HIPAA privacy regulations (the Privacy Regulations). Protected health information is information about a person's health or treatment that identifies the person.

I pledge and agree to use and disclose any of this protected health information only for the training and/or educational purposes of my visit and to keep the information confidential.

I understand that I may direct to the Johns Hopkins Privacy Officer any questions I have about my obligations under this Confidentiality Pledge or under any of the Hopkins policies and procedures and applicable laws and regulations related to confidentiality. The contact information is Johns Hopkins Privacy Officer, telephone: 410-735-6509, e-mail: HIPAA@jhmi.edu.

"The Office of Continuing Medical Education at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, as provider of this activity, has relayed information with the CME attendees/participants and certifies that the visitor is attending for training, education and/or observation purposes only."

For CME Questions, please contact the CME Office at (410) 955-2959 or e-mail cmenet@jhmi.edu. For CME Certificates, please call (410) 502-9634.

The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Office of Continuing Medical Education
Turner 20/720 Rutland Avenue
Baltimore, Maryland 21205-2195

Reviewed and Approved by
General Counsel, Johns Hopkins Medicine (4/1/03)
Updated 4/09

Hardware & Software Requirements

Pentium 800 processor or greater, Windows 98/NT/2000/XP or Mac OS 9/X, Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.5 or later, 56K Modem or better, Windows Media Player 9.0 or later, 128 MB of RAM Monitor settings: High color at 800 x 600 pixels, Sound card and speakers, Adobe Acrobat Reader, storage, internet connectivity, and minimum connection speed.



Copyright © JHUSOM, IJHN, and eNeonatal Review

Presented by JHUSOM & IJHN in collaboration with DKBmed.

Spacer
Spacer
Newsletter Header



Current Newsletter

Recommend to a colleague

OTHER VALUABLE RESOURCES
Otheer Valuable resources APS/SPR
AAP
AARC
AWHONN
NANN



Share on Facebook


JHU Logo
Hopkins Nursing Logo

PRIVACYSpacerLEGAL DISCLAIMERSpacerCONTACT USSpacerFollow DKBmed on Twitter